Data and Tools

EEG-calculator and the “Agorameter” are our flagships, along with many smaller applications and data sets.

To make well-founded decisions on the future development of the power system, Agora Energiewende has sought to create the most reliable data and energy economy models possible and, as far as legally possible, to make these public.  These include our own products such as the Agorameter and the EEG-calculator, as well as Excel tools and data sets developed in the course of our studies. Our sources, data and calculation methods are presented as transparently as possible.

For example, more than 1.5 million large and small plants produce and supply power to the network. At the same time, millions of consumers draw power from the network. This complex system can only be thoroughly understood when data is available in a highly aggregated form.

The goals of the Energiewende are measured by how much electricity usage is covered by renewable energies. The progress and success of the Energiewende therefore depends on the extent to which the power system reaches these goals – a question that also is closely related to accessible data.

The same goes for the costs of the Energiewende. This depends, among other things, on which production technologies are used and on a variety of scenarios. The EEG-calculator is a tool anyone can use to calculate these costs and easily develop their own scenarios.

In addition, for many of our studies, we make the models and data they are based on available to the public – for example, costs related to production technologies.

Contact

Yu-Chi Chang

Yu-Chi Chang

Studentischer Mitarbeiter Internationale Energiedaten und Modellierung

Core results

  1. 1

    China’s carbon neutrality pledge sent positive shock waves through the international climate community and has boosted its clean-energy transition efforts.

    It remains to be seen how China will balance its short-term interest in economic stimulus through carbon-intensive investment with its medium-to-long-term interest in peaking national emissions as soon as possible.

  2. 2

    All forms of energy demand, including coal, grew last year, which does not bode well for China’s ambitious international climate commitment.

    While the rest of the world experienced economic contraction in 2020, China’s economy grew, increasing its share of global carbon emissions by two percentage points. China must urgently downsize its gigantic national coal consumption, which makes up more than half of the global total.

  3. 3

    While the COVID-19 economic contraction in China is likely to be short-lived, the pandemic’s profound impact on China’s energy sector and global geopolitics is expected to be felt for many years to come.

    In the post-COVID-19 world, China is likely to face a much more contentious geopolitical environment. Beijing could stabilize its role in the world by becoming a leader in the global transition to clean energy.

  1. 1

    The EU’s “Fit for 55” climate policy architecture must guarantee environmental integrity and address solidarity.

    To guarantee both, the architecture must have a robust compliance mechanism. Whatever EU climate policy architecture is chosen, each ton of CO2 must be governed by the ETS or the Effort Sharing mechanism. At the same time, the target achievement must be a collective endeavor that supports lower-income Member States and poorer households.

  2. 2

    There are different options for strengthening the ETS and/or effort sharing while ensuring the environmental integrity of the 55% target.

    A standalone ETS for transport and/or buildings, an enlarged EU ETS, or tightened effort sharing are all options that could work, and each has their pros and cons. The important thing is to define who is accountable for reducing emissions, and who will be responsible if targets are not met. When emissions trading serves as the central compliance mechanism, prices must be allowed to rise as high as necessary to reach the emission reduction target – which means not introducing a price cap.

  3. 3

    A carbon price works better if it is supported by companion policies.

    This holds especially true for households and transport. Companion policies in these sectors guide investment decisions and drive innovation, while the carbon price ad-dresses the use of existing cars and heating systems. Strengthening EU-policies such as CO2 standards for vehicles, building codes, or support programs for low-carbon heat grids gives consumers the low-carbon options they need to respond to rising carbon prices and to reduce emissions in line with the 55% target.

  4. 4

    Distributional effects are a challenge but there are solutions for resolving them.

    100% of revenues from carbon pricing must flow back to consumers in one way or another – as targeted support for vulnerable households, as a fund for climate policy measures, or as lump-sum payments. Using carbon pricing revenues for other purposes such as repaying EU debt threaten to undermine support for higher CO2 prices. It is better to use tools that enable consumers to reduce their CO2 footprint, and thus their exposure to higher prices, rather than simply trying to exempt consumer

    groups generally.

  1. 1

    The Japanese power system can accommodate a larger proportion of renewables (RES) than is currently provided for in the government’s 2030 targets, while still maintaining grid stability.

    An annual share of at least 33% RES (22% variable renewables – VRES) can easily be integrated, while still maintaining grid stability within a tolerable range. A higher renewable share of 40% (30% VRES) could also be achieved with very low curtailment level.

  2. 2

    There already exist a number of technical measures to improve grid stability in situations where a high proportion of variable renewables could place a strain on grid operations.

    Indeed, VRES can contribute to maintaining grid stability by providing fast frequency response (FFR). On conservative assumptions, this study shows that such FFR services would enable the existing Japanese transmission grid to incorporate instantaneous VRES penetration levels of up to 60% in eastern Japan and around 70% in western Japan, while still maintaining frequency stability. These assessments confirm the trends observed in 2018 in regions such as Kyushu or Shikoku, where hourly VRES penetration satisfied more than 80% of demand (corresponding to more than 55% of all power generation). By 2030, these high regional infeed levels could become the norm for the Japanese system as a whole. Furthermore, implementing additional technical measures would allow even higher penetration levels to be reached.

  3. 3

    Integrated grid and resource planning can help mitigate the impact of wind and solar PV deployment on intraregional and interregional load flows.

    Increasing the proportion of VRES in the mix is expected to reduce power line loading in some regions and increase it in other parts of the system. The impact of VRES distribution on the grid must therefore be systematically taken into account in future grid development plans, in order to avoid creating line-loading hotspots.

  4. 4

    Non-discriminatory market regulations, enhanced transparency, and state-of-the-art operational and planning practices facilitate the integration of a higher proportion of variable renewables.

    In particular, renewables should be incorporated into ancillary service provision, since they can contribute to frequency stability, balancing, and voltage control in tandem with other technologies (such as demand side response, conventional generation, and storage).

  1. 1

    The Japanese power system can accommodate a larger proportion of renewables (RES) than is currently provided for in the government’s 2030 targets, while still maintaining grid stability.

    An annual share of at least 33% RES (22% variable renewables – VRES) can easily be integrated, while still maintaining grid stability within a tolerable range. A higher renewable share of 40% (30% VRES) could also be achieved with very low curtailment level.

  2. 2

    There already exist a number of technical measures to improve grid stability in situations where a high proportion of variable renewables could place a strain on grid operations.

    Indeed, VRES can contribute to maintaining grid stability by providing fast frequency response (FFR). On conservative assumptions, this study shows that such FFR services would enable the existing Japanese transmission grid to incorporate instantaneous VRES penetration levels of up to 60% in eastern Japan and around 70% in western Japan, while still maintaining frequency stability. These assessments confirm the trends observed in 2018 in regions such as Kyushu or Shikoku, where hourly VRES penetration satisfied more than 80% of demand (corresponding to more than 55% of all power generation). By 2030, these high regional infeed levels could become the norm for the Japanese system as a whole. Furthermore, implementing additional technical measures would allow even higher penetration levels to be reached.

  3. 3

    Integrated grid and resource planning can help mitigate the impact of wind and solar PV deployment on intraregional and interregional load flows.

    Increasing the proportion of VRES in the mix is expected to reduce power line loading in some regions and increase it in other parts of the system. The impact of VRES distribution on the grid must therefore be systematically taken into account in future grid development plans, in order to avoid creating line-loading hotspots.

  4. 4

    Non-discriminatory market regulations, enhanced transparency, and state-of-the-art operational and planning practices facilitate the integration of a higher proportion of variable renewables.

    In particular, renewables should be incorporated into ancillary service provision, since they can contribute to frequency stability, balancing, and voltage control in tandem with other technologies (such as demand side response, conventional generation, and storage).

  1. 1

    The Japanese power system can accommodate a larger proportion of renewables (RES) than is currently provided for in the government’s 2030 targets, while still maintaining grid stability.

    An annual share of at least 33% RES (22% variable renewables – VRES) can easily be integrated, while still maintaining grid stability within a tolerable range. A higher renewable share of 40% (30% VRES) could also be achieved with very low curtailment level.

  2. 2

    There already exist a number of technical measures to improve grid stability in situations where a high proportion of variable renewables could place a strain on grid operations.

    Indeed, VRES can contribute to maintaining grid stability by providing fast frequency response (FFR). On conservative assumptions, this study shows that such FFR services would enable the existing Japanese transmission grid to incorporate instantaneous VRES penetration levels of up to 60% in eastern Japan and around 70% in western Japan, while still maintaining frequency stability. These assessments confirm the trends observed in 2018 in regions such as Kyushu or Shikoku, where hourly VRES penetration satisfied more than 80% of demand (corresponding to more than 55% of all power generation). By 2030, these high regional infeed levels could become the norm for the Japanese system as a whole. Furthermore, implementing additional technical measures would allow even higher penetration levels to be reached.

  3. 3

    Integrated grid and resource planning can help mitigate the impact of wind and solar PV deployment on intraregional and interregional load flows.

    Increasing the proportion of VRES in the mix is expected to reduce power line loading in some regions and increase it in other parts of the system. The impact of VRES distribution on the grid must therefore be systematically taken into account in future grid development plans, in order to avoid creating line-loading hotspots.

  4. 4

    Non-discriminatory market regulations, enhanced transparency, and state-of-the-art operational and planning practices facilitate the integration of a higher proportion of variable renewables.

    In particular, renewables should be incorporated into ancillary service provision, since they can contribute to frequency stability, balancing, and voltage control in tandem with other technologies (such as demand side response, conventional generation, and storage).

Projects

Latest News

    10 benchmarks to make Europe’s revamp of climate and energy laws a success

    In July 2021, the European Commission is expected to present its major Fit for 55 package aimed at achieving the new EU climate target of at least 55 percent greenhouse gas emission reductions by 2030. A new report by think tank Agora Energiewende identifies 10 benchmarks for the July package to be truly “Fit for 55”.
     

    What EU leaders fail to discuss: Bold choices on Europe’s higher 2030 climate ambition

    Which role should CO2 pricing play in future climate policy? Should Member States or EU wide policies be responsible to deliver the 2030 target? To whom should money be flowing? Agora Energiewende’s new study addresses the key options for the “Fit for 55” climate package that should have been discussed at the European Council on March 25.
     
  • [Translate to English:]

    Renewables overtake gas and coal in EU electricity generation

    In 2020, wind, solar, hydropower and biomass supplied 38 percent of the EU's electricity, according to an analysis by Ember and Agora Energiewende. Germany has the third highest share of renewables in the European Union.
     

    Japan’s Grid Can Handle More Wind and Solar Power than Currently Envisioned by Its Government

    Although Japan has experienced a solar boom in the past five years, ongoing concerns about the stability of its power grid have slowed the expansion of wind and solar, leaving the country with renewable energy targets below the global average. But an independent study has shown that technical solutions exist that can help Japan meet the challenges of transitioning to clean energy.

     

All Content

Stay in touch. Subscribe to our newsletter.

]>