Catrina Laura Godinho

PhD Candidate at the University of Cape Town

Catrina Laura Godinho

Catrina Godinho is a Research Associate and PhD Candidate at the University of Cape Town (UCT), South Africa. She also holds the position of OIES-Saudi Aramco Fellow at the Oxford Institute of Energy Studies (OIES) at the University of Oxford, United Kingdom and is a Fellow at the Energy for Growth Hub think tank.

Catrina focuses her doctoral research on the political economy of power sector reform and development, with special attention to the Sub-Saharan African experience with or through in-depth case studies in Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda.

Alongside her doctoral studies, Catrina’s international research and advisory work has included contributions to the World Bank’s Rethinking Power Sector Reform project, the DFID funded Energy and Economic Growth (EEG) project and the Economic Development and Institutions (EDI) project, and AFDB’s Revisiting Reforms in the Power Sector in Africa. In South Africa, Catrina has worked on issues relating to energy security, decarbonisation and climate change policy, and state capture and governance in the power sector. Catrina was a member of the South African UNFCCC delegation, working on issues relating to capacity building, technology development and transfer, and scientific review, in 2014 and 2015.

Catrina is currently undertaking research on the political economy of a South African energy transition.

German power market developments June 2020 vs. June 2019: More electricity from natural gas while coal-fired generation is massively reduced. Electricity demand continues to be weak and also renewables lose compared to June 2019. pic.twitter.com/nBCHDHiU2Z

Strommarkt-Vergleich Juni 2020/Juni 2019: Deutlich mehr Strom aus Erdgas, Kohleverstromung lässt hingegen massiv nach. Stromverbrauch weiter gering und auch EE verlieren im Vergleich zum Vorjahresmonat. pic.twitter.com/EwlRsuZyBQ

German power generation in June 2020: Renewables (especially PV) have a hard time beating the exceptionally hot June 2019. However, due to the continued weaker electricity demand, the share remains at 46%. Most powerful force is natural gas, lignite only ranks 3rd. pic.twitter.com/WOo46yt3y5

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